My Magic Cure

For years I resisted handing out Band-Aids® to the children all willy nilly. Not every injury is bloody enough to justify a Band-Aid®, you know? It’s not like they grow on trees or anything—they cost money!

Then a few years ago, I read someone’s top ten list of parenting advice—don’t ask me what the better gems of parenting truths were, because all I remember was “Give your children a Band-Aid® anytime they ask. They are the cheapest way to create smiles, heal imagined wounds and stop tears.” It was a compelling enough of an argument that I changed my ways right then and there. I procured approximately ten colorful boxes of the things, covered with their favorite licensed characters, and passed them out several times per day. Bug bite on your tummy? Here’s a Band-Aid®. Cat scratch on your arm? Have a Band Aid®. Dirt beneath finger nails? There’s a Band-Aid® for that, too.

One of my fondest uses of a Band-Aid® is to cure a knee scrape that is red but not actually bleeding—the kind of wound that my kid SWEARS will ooze blood everywhere unless I put that magical Band-Aid® on it, but in reality it’s just a red speck beneath her skin. The fact that she is so concerned, and so convinced that her scrape is so much more serious than it really is just makes me chuckle, every time.

Just today, Twin B hit Twin A. The incident involved a plastic golf club barely tapping her on her forearm as they sat adjacent to each other in their high chars, but OH! THE DRAMA! As I chastised the boy for hitting and tried to calm the girl down with my words, I had a bright idea: put a Band-Aid® on the (non-existent) boo boo and see what happens.

Well, the Band-Aid® fixed everything. The invisible injury was magically cured the moment that sticky bandage of love touched it. And the boy was appropriately jealous of his sister, who sported a Band-Aid® with pictures of his favorite animated characters on it. He hastily apologized to his twin for hitting, and then begged for his own Band-Aid®.

So let this be a lesson to my less experienced cohorts: Once you have kids, buy many boxes of Band-Aids®. And if you have twins (or more), maybe consider buying stock in Johnson & Johnson—‘cause you’re about to go through a LOT of Band-Aids®.

(Note:  The point of this was to share my funny thoughts about silly kids and the simple magic cure for their owies, not to promote a particular brand.  I do only use Band-Aid® brand bandages because I’ve tried the knock-offs and they are not as good.  J&J has no idea that I have written this and nobody has asked me to do so.)

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In case anyone noticed, my Twin Tuesday blog this week was posted much later in the day than normal. You see, instead of polishing up the final draft of my post on Monday night, I spent that time in the Emergency Department with Twin A. She suffered a horrific fall from her high chair last night, and THAT injury was just too much for a cartoon-covered Band-Aid® to handle. Her CT scan was clear and she’s fine today, aside from the unicorn horn sized black and blue knot protruding from her forehead. She is, of course, wearing a Band-Aid® on her arm for now until her head is less tender. She’s my little trooper!
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Cassandra can be found on Twitter @aclevergirl.  Learn more about her family’s unique challenges and why they have hope for a cure for muscular dystrophy at Byrds for a Cure.

Comments

  1. Kelly says:

    I love how Band-Aid has the little registered symbol next to it every single time… It’s the official boo boo covering in the Byrd household. Oh and… I love your guts and you got a like from my friend Laura Lee on FB. <3

  2. Cassandra says:

    I could post a series of blog posts on the evolution of this bruise. It went from cringe-worthy last night to downright disgusting today. Oh, what wishful thinking it was to think that I could have their birthday portraits done in a couple of weeks! Yeah, this is going to take months to heal from. I’m not complaining–no brain bleed, no shunt, no concussion, even. Hooray for silver linings!